Pages

3.21.2011

Don't be a drag, just be a Queen: Abby

Queen #5: Abby

I don't know how i first came across Abby's blog, but i do know that it was her calm wit and simple charm that drew me in. A "delightful" combo of a romantic heart, girl next door appeal and endearing delivery of thought. One thing that truly stands out with Abby is how approachable and humble she is. The more i read the more i love her perspective on life. It would be easy to simply admire the cover of her life's book: she's beautiful and stylish, her husband is sensitive and handsome, two cute kids and bunch of great pictures of family and island adventures to show for it. But there isn't an ounce of pretentiousness about her and that is what crowns her as my latest drag free Queen. Her story about motherhood is a perfect example of her humility:
"We spent the first half of 2010 living in the West Indies. In other words, a really really really small island in the Caribbean. Sounds like a dream right? My husband was in medical school and he generally left the house before our two kids woke up and returned long after they were asleep. The school provided transportation for students and I can still hear the HOOOOONK of the taxi bus as it roared down the tiny street to our house at 7 each morning. It meant that I was a single mother for the day. A single mother without a car and without a clue. Thinking about the honk of that bus still gives me a little stomachache.
I spent a lot of time hand washing dishes while staring out the window at cruise ships, hanging laundry on the clothesline, and sweeping great masses of ants out the door. (The ants were out to get me.) My kids watched many a classic cartoon on the only kids channel we had. I can still hear the theme jingle for that channel in my mind. It also gives me a little stomachache. A girl can only take so much Scooby Doo.




During this time my husband was incredibly stressed with school. This made me incredibly stressed. This made my 4- and 2-year-old incredibly stressed. My son started peeing his pants and the bed. He'd also raid the refrigerator every two minutes. It became this power struggle between us. I'd often sob in front of him after he'd wet his pants for the second time that day, or when he'd demand we "go back to the United States." We'd go to the grocery store in a taxi and the kids would beg for sugary cereals that cost the equivalent of $10 US, or or a jug of juice that was $7 (and, oh-by-the-way, totally expired.) They'd throw fits when they didn't get them. Oh man, it was ugly at times. I truly would have staked my life on the fact that I would never miss this time in our lives. And I really began to hate myself as a mother. Cue the stomachache.
The second half of 2010 found us back home again. My husband and I had weighed our options when the semester had ended and found through prayer and many, many tears (surely the Caribbean's salty waters rose a few inches that spring) that going home would be a good idea. It has been. There's pain and embarrassment in letting go of some dreams and admitting a sort of failure, but now I have such a different perspective on those five months. I think about the many sweltering afternoons at the breathtaking beaches, teaching Sunday School to the children at church and joining our voices with theirs in song, picking the most delicious ripe mangoes straight from the trees, proudly figuring out how to handle the many roundabouts while driving on the left. My parents came to visit and we packed that week full of every adventure we could- hiking the volcano, riding the sugar train, ferrying to a nearby island, and visiting the 400-year-old British fortress. Really wonderful times. And there's not a day goes by that I don't think of the wonderful friends we made there. Some were temporary visitors like us and some will never set foot off that little land. I cherish them all so dearly. I also surprisingly (to me) cherish the horrible days because it means I survived them and left a different person. Out of a lot a pain mixed with some joy, out of a really difficult experience, came a treasure.
My kids still throw fits at the grocery store. I still sometimes cry in front of them when I'm having a bad day. Instead of ants, I battle with the bone-chilling cold and snow of January, February, and March. (Those months are so out to get me.) In other words, life is still hard! Even on the mainland! Even when I get to see my husband for more than an hour a day! And the common thread is motherhood. Being a mother is so hard. So hard! Some days there is really no difference between "stuck on an island" and "stuck with two crying kids." It can be a remarkably similar feeling. But I know some day I'll see these young mother days as really beautiful. From "our really expensive Caribbean vacation" I learned that most life experiences require some time to mature- to soak, to steep, to marinate- before they become palatable to the soul. I'm busy enjoying everything in my life, especially young motherhood. Before long, it will taste so sweet.
-abby"

thanks abby!
team Boo 's you

15 comments:

Tiffany said...

I love this post. Thanks for finding these queens to share with us.

communikate. said...

geez louise abby! what a writer you are!

carolyn, you're absolutely right about how humble abby is. i'd say she's one of the most humble bloggers out there.

Buffalo Gal said...

abby-that was a sweet, and refreshing story...traveling around with my family seems like a dream, but that story put a lot into perspective...your a trooper and thanks for being so honest and real! i love when mom's tell it like it is {i sure do ;}

cara. said...

you have picked some good girls. i love that abby sharp. let's all get together and call it a blog convention.

Katie Hunter said...

Tears. For having my own feelings about motherhood expressed so clearly. Especially... no difference between "stuck on an island" and "stuck with two crying kids." All mothers feel isolated at some point, somehow. Thank you for sharing and reminding me that I'm not alone.

kelly said...

seriously, who doesn't love some abby? Humbly keeping it real.

robin said...

i love abby. i don't "really" know her but i sure love her!

Ash said...

Abby you are a great writer! My husband is about to go to medical school, and while our situations are pretty different (I don't have any cute babies for one), I really really appreciate your honesty.

Natalie said...

i love abby. and that was beautiful, as is she.

Jenna Eve said...

I love Abby's blog and this was one of her best yet.

Sarah said...

I want to be Abby when I grow up. She is a wise soul. And she's my sister.

Angie said...

Thank you for sharing your heart and soul here, Abby. Beautiful. Good for you. Good for you for sharing something so personal in a way that SO MANY young mothers would benefit from. Made my day.

angela hardison said...

i've always loved abby's blog for the same reasons.

beautiful words and thoughts.

Bekah: said...

Wow! I have been missing the Abby band wagon. Love her words!

russandkatie said...

I loved reading that! Well said Abby!!!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...